JS Mill on education

A general state education is a mere contrivance for moulding people to be exactly like one another: and as the mould in which it casts them is that which pleses the preominant ower in teh government, whether this be a monarch, a priesthood, an aristocracy, or the majority of the existing generation; in proportion as it is efficient and successful, it establishes a despotism over the mind, leading by natural tendency to one over the body.

John Stuart Mill, quoted in E.G. West, Education and the State: A Study in Political Economy, Liberty Fund Books

Today is the big day

If you register for the conference by midnight, you will save $15/person while guaranteeing a seat. Quite a few registations have come in over the past couple weeks. No, you are not about to be shut out, but there’s no telling how long it will take to fill. Go to www.circeinstitute.org to secure your future! Or at least your seat.

Hazlitt on controversial subjects

“When a thing ceases to be a subject of controversy, it ceases to be a subject of interest.”

– William Hazlitt, English writer and literary critic (1778-1830)

“The end of all learning” – Erasmus

“All studies, philosophy, rhetoric are followed for this one object, that we may know Christ and honor him.  This is the end of all learning and eloquence.”

– Desiderius Erasmus

Don’t forget

The early conference registration ends tomorrow. Here’s a taste of some of what you dont’ want to miss:

  • Vigen Guroian: The office of childhood
  • VG: The Liturgy of Creation: The Melody of Faith
  • Martin Cothran: The Nature of Nature
  • MC: Education: Agrarian or industrial
  • Karen Kern: The Nature of the Moral Imagination and how to cultivate it
  • James Daniels: The Nature of the Liberal Arts and how to teach them
  • JD: The Implications of the Incarnation on Teaching
  • Andrew Pudewa: Teaching Boys and Other Kids who would rather be making forts (what the neurosciences are revealing about the nature of boys and girls and how to teach them)
  • AP: Nature Deficit Disorder
  • John Hodges: The Effect of Naturalism on the arts (whatever happened to beauty?)
  • Leah Lutz: The Nature of Thought: How to simplify and unify your teaching with the mimetic mode
  • LL: The Canons of Rhetoric; the backbone of the Language arts

In addition, I’ll be opening with a talk that sets the table for the other speakers, but the thought that has been invigorating me and causing me to realize how important this theme of nature is arises from the person of Christ the Logos, the glory of learning. Our Lord really can be the unifying principle of all things because He brings together in one person two natures: the Divine and the Human.

And that means we need to think hard about what human nature is.

Can we transcend it? If we can, then we can transcend God, because God, in Christ, is a man. Not gonna happen!

Is it evil? How can it be if Christ has taken it on. The crucial distinction lies in the difference between a state of nature and the essential nature. We are in a sinful state, but our human nature is essentially good. Long after sin has been completely washed away, “when we’ve been there 10,000 years/bright shining as the sun,” we’ll be nothing but humans who “participate in the Divine Nature.”

This mind-numbing doctrine is brought to you straight from the pages of the New Testament, or I’d never dare say a word of it.

I sincerely hope you can attend this conference. Every day I’m more convinced of its importance.

And don’t forget Marcus and Laura Berquist – winner’s of the Paideia Prize for Lifetime Contribution to Classical Education!!

Register by 4/30 and you’ll save something like $15/person while ensuring a seat (they are filling up pretty quickly now that the school year is winding down, though I’m pretty sure you don’t have to panic yet).

Kern on Gamble on Clement on Anaxarchus on Sovereignty

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Anaxarchus the Eudaemonist wrote well in his book On Sovereignty: Wide learning is both of great advantage and great disadvantage to its possessor. It benefits the person of skill, it damages the person who lightly says anything in any company. You must know the limits of the appropriate moment. That is the definition of wisdom. Those who make speeches at the wrong moment, even if they are full of sense, are not counted wise and have a reputation for folly.”

Quoted by Clement of Alexandria in the Stromateis, selected by Richard Gamble in The Great Tradition.

The Great Tradition

The Great Tradition

Meet Attractive Christian Singles Near You

I really did see that on an ad. I wonder if the advertisers were Christians.

At least pop-Christianity provides amusement when you can avoid thinking about it too seriously.