Resources & Schools

THE FOLLOWING IS A LIST OF BOOKS ON CLASSICAL CHRISTIAN EDUCATION:

class_ed

Classical Education: The Movement Sweeping America

Norms & Nobility: A Treatise on Education

Norms & Nobility: A Treatise on Education

Poetic Knowledge: The Recovery of Education

Poetic Knowledge: The Recovery of Education

Christianity and Classical Culture: A Study of Thought and Action from Augutus to Augustine

Christianity and Classical Culture: A Study of Thought and Action from Augutus to Augustine

THE FOLLOWING IS A LIST OF ORGANIZATIONS, PUBLICATIONS, RESEARCHERS, AND BLOGS ON CLASSICAL EDUCATION (INCLUDING HOMESCHOOLING):

ON HOME EDUCATION:

LOOKING FOR A CLASSICAL SCHOOL? BELOW ARE LINKS TO SOME OF THE BEST:

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12 Responses

  1. Quiddity,

    I am the Marketing Director and a parent at a great classical school called Liberty Classical Academy in Minnesota. How do we get our school included in your list above? Thanks for your response!

    Christine

  2. Mr. Andrew Kern,

    I read your book as I am writing my thesis on Classical Education at Southwestern Theological Seminary. I was wondering if you know of any places i.e. journals where I can get some data from a controlled study done comparing classical education to secular and progressive private education. Thank You for your time,

    Ben Turner

    • Ben,

      Thanks for taking the trouble to read my book. I hope you found it helpful.

      You ask an interesting question because, frankly, a controlled study would already be a secular and progressive approach to assessing education. In effect, you’ve already determined the field to play on and the game to play before beginning the evaluation!

      I don’t know of any that have been completed and I’ve been out of that loop for a few years. Let me see what I can find out in my own research and I’ll try to get back to you. I’m very interested in what you can find out as well.

      Thanks.

      • Mr. Kern,

        I completely agree since the most important thing that we strive for our children i.e. glorifying God cannot be measured. But I would argue that data can get others to listen and thus give the credibility classical education deserves. You mentioned in your book about Regents School in Austin, TX passing the SAT with flying colors way above the national average; all that just being eighth graders. I think these things turn heads and perk the ears.

        On a side note, Do you recommend any “teach yourself Latin” materials?

        By the way, I hope to meet you this Summer in Dallas. I plan on attending the conference.

        Thanks for your time,

        Ben

        • Ben,

          I’ve got a lot crankier since I wrote that book. My trouble is that we are so steeped in progressive reflexes that we are like drunks with a whiskey shot when the put that SAT in front of us.

          Plato said, “What is honored is cultivated.” When we can boast about our SAT scores, it turns the heads of the world around us. So they give us their money – er, students. And we’re altered. Permanently. We were honored for doing what took no effort and we aren’t honored for what made that thing take no effort. So we quit promoting and living the vision and promote and live our accomplishments instead.

          As I said, I’m getting crankier in my dotage.

          If a school can relegate the standardized tests and all the measurables to the limited non-influence that they ought to have on the way we function as a school with a vision, then go for it. But few can. We don’t realize how much we are Darwinists.

          Anyway, this is the world we live in, so it’s the one we need to live in wisely. I’m eager to hear what you discover and will keep my own mind open to what I hear.

          On teaching yourself Latin, I’d use Henle and I’d be cruel. Vocabulary is pretty easy to pick up, so focus on the grammar and form. It’s just plain hard work at first. But if you possbily can get a teacher, do. Wes Callihan or Fritz Hinrichs or the Potters School might be able to help you with an on-line course.

          I’d love to see you in Dallas! Please make sure you introduce yourself. I’ll be less cranky then. I get pretty excited at those conferences!

          ; )

  3. Do you know of master’s degree programs in classical education that are regionally accredited?

  4. Mr. Andrew Kern,
    I found Quiddity through my sister’s blog and am greatly enjoying it. I don’t know if you remember me, but I took your Latin class and studied Dante under your guidance with a homeschool class in Boise, ID. My mother, Joan Prize, was secretary at Foundations Academy at that time (1998-99). What a joy to discover your talent and expertise on the web! I am now married and have four children ages 5, 3, 2 and 1 month. I’m looking for a classical school in the south suburbs area of Chicago, IL. Is there any place near here you would recommend? I am currently homeschooling my oldest with a basic Kindergarten curriculum. Thank you!

    • Hannah

      I remember you very well. You were a ballerina. Are you still dancing?

      Tell me three or four of the south suburbs and I’ll see if I know of a classical school, but I would sincerely encourage you to continue to home school as long as you can. The minute they stop playing with the real living world and have to sit still for multiple hours without being read to is the minute their minds begin to stultify. They need to do it, I think, but not too soon.

      I went to school in Oak Park, IL but I think that is west of Chicago. Look up the Greenhouse and see how far that is from where you live. I think it’s rather a way.

      Can you believe ten years have passed? David, my first born, is married now. Did you meet him or Matt?

      Stay in touch!

  5. I’m looking to classically homeschool my children and need a good core curriculum. Can you please recommend one? They have previously attended the Geneva School of Manhattan and now we live in Tennessee.

    • Lori,

      I’d need to know what you mean, as people use the term “core curriculum” in many ways. Also, how old are your children?

      Did your children have the great privilege of studying under Buck Holler?

      How do you like TN?

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